Since arriving in Japan in 2000, Carlo has found inspiration to write. During the initial years in this most
impressionable country he wrote about the music business, with the aim of sharing his own experience for the
benefit of others. The book 'Entertainment Value' is however (as it's title suggests) a form of instruction manual for
musicians on how to become consummate entertainers by understanding more about stage performance and how
to discover the entertainer in themselves. The book serves equally well in the curriculum of performing arts
colleges as to non-performers working in the industry, and indeed the general reader.
1. Organization [ Dealing with: Venues, Booking Agents, Promoters, Organizers /
Publicity / Selecting a venue / The Audience / Communicating Staging Requirements
/ Rehearsals and Set-Up / The Contract ]
2. Presentation [ Staging / Instruments / Costume / Dressing Rooms / Lighting /
Sound / Stagehands, M.C.'s and others / Audio and Visual records / Posters,
Programmes, CD's and Autographs]
3. Programming [ Assembling a Program / Program Time / Choosing Pieces /
Concerts, Series, Repeat Performances / Background Music ]
4. Personality [ Recognizing Personal Assets and Attributes / Personality in a
Performance / Personality in a Piece / The Body, Voice and Speech / Reactions to
Audience and other Performers ]
"Time is money. That's what they say in virtually any business these days. So if one is serious about
being in the professional music business, then this should be one of the golden rules to keep in mind.
It is especially true in the organizational aspect of being a performer."
"... child-hood is a dream that ends when the stark reality that is adult-hood begins" ...
"... 'Due to popular demand' sounds much better than ... 'a poor attendance' in the reviews"
"... a picture tells a thousand words. ... the publicity pamphlet of a female concert pianist whose text
reads very glowingly of her experience, knowledge and musical attributes and achievements, while the
glossy color photograph shows her scantily dressed, lying on a leopard-skin rug and gesturing
provocatively at the camera."
"At a particular time in their career a performer finds themselves entering a phase affectionately
termed "the twilight zone" (though it is hardly received with much affection!)"
"Perhaps a performer's success begins when they learn to move an audience with their own, unique
personality."
In 2005 Carlo completed his second book. It is a mid-life and music career retrospective. The main aim was to
present an autobiographical account which would allow other musicians (especially those at the outset of their
career) to gain valuable knowledge, advice and reflections that would help them manage their own paths.
Altogether the intriguing story of a journey in search of culture, personal survival and meaning of life itself, it
spans more than eighty years; from his parent's origins, musical and personal influences and experiences, to
thoughts for the future.  
Part One
1. Origins   2. Curiosity Becomes Thirst   3. The First Circle   
4. Europe Re-Captured  5. Many Roads, One End   6. On The Outside
Part Two
7. Sink Or Swim   8. Rewards   9. Showtime!   10. To The Future
"She had a wonderful Italian soprano voice that seemed to penetrate into me so deeply that I wanted to
cry. The warm sounds and vibrations against my body as she sang: I believe these alone made many
more impressions on my soul than I may ever know. Probably, more than all the other musical
experiences in my entire life."
"... as if I had reached the end of the road with a burning desire to challenge still burning inside me, but
nowhere to vent it."
"... yes, I am on a train, those are the snow-covered mountains of the Tyrol, that is a grand piano I'm
playing and I am being paid to be here!"
"... the music in my life was beginning to shut-down; I began to avoid anything to do with music,
especially live music."
"His interpretation and feeling for each and every bar of music was impeccable, sending eerie tingles
up my spine and over my scalp with frightening regularity throughout the concert. The energy was
enormous and I was soon to feel its powerful origin."
"... I cannot accept that music does not have a far, far greater, more fundamental role to play in the
responsibility humans have toward a global village of love and respect for one-another."